Putting creativity at the heart of each student’s learning journey

Deep but entertaining talks by late Sir Ken Robinson, warmly recommended to all educators out there.

A legendary figure in the fields of education and creativity, Sir Ken Robinson, has recently died at the age of 70. He was the world’s best-known and most entertaining educator and his talk “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” was the most-watched TED talk of all times. We are sharing his TED Talks below. Sit back, enjoy and remember to share and comment, your opinion matters!

Do schools kill creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

 

How to escape education’s death valley

In this video, Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish – and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

About Sir Ken Robinson

The educationist Sir Ken Robinson (born 4 March 1950; died 21 August 2020) was a leading proponent of the encouragement of creativity among children. He argued that children’s creativity is stifled by school systems that prioritize academic achievement.

The Guardian: “Reputedly one lesson can change the course of a pupil’s career – Robinson became an exemplar of the much rarer idea that one speech can change a teacher’s whole trajectory. It was an off-the-cuff, 19-minute address without notes entitled “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” at a TED (technology, entertainment and design) educational conference in California in 2006 that propelled him to something approaching worldwide celebrity within and beyond education.”

You are very welcome to take part in the discussion on the subject of education and creativity in the Communication & Languages Group on LinkedIn (please click here).

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